Join the Campaign to Save Vietnam’s Pangolins from Extinction

Just as the world is starting to learn about the amazing pangolin, this wonderfully strange animal is approaching the brink of extinction -- due entirely to human consumption. Photo: ENV / youcaring
Just as the world is starting to learn about the amazing pangolin, this wonderfully strange animal is approaching the brink of extinction — due entirely to human consumption. Photo: ENV / youcaring

In an effort to stop Vietnam’s pangolins from literally being eaten to extinction, a local NGO has embarked on a multi-faceted campaign to stop the illegal trade and consumption of pangolins.

Education for Nature-Vietnam (ENV), established in 2000 as Vietnam’s first non-profit organization focusing on the protection of nature and wildlife, has had a busy year protecting pangolins.

  • January 2015: ENV aired the first ever pangolin PSA in Vietnam, which was shown on 86 channels across the country, encouraging the public to report pangolin-related crimes.
  • June 2015: ENV succeeded in securing changes to the law to afford far greater protection to pangolins.

You can help save Vietnam’s pangolins by supporting Education for Nature-Vietnam’s campaign.

This endearing mammal may very well go extinct before most of the world has even heard of it. Photo: ENV / youcaring
This endearing mammal may very well go extinct before most of the world has even heard of it. Photo: ENV / youcaring

Your donations will help ENV fight to save this precious species from extinction by:

  • Continuing to spread awareness about pangolin protection;
  • Shutting down shops and restaurants that kill and sell pangolins.

The two species of pangolin native to Vietnam, the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) and Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica), are literally being eaten to extinction. Their populations are thought to have declined by an estimated 80 percent and 90 percent respectively over the past 20 years.

Every year, tens of thousands of pangolins are captured, slaughtered, and stripped of their scales for use in traditional medicine. Other pangolins are kept alive in restaurants until they are ordered as a high-end delicacy. Photo: ENV / youcaring
Every year, tens of thousands of pangolins are captured, slaughtered, and stripped of their scales for use in traditional medicine. Other pangolins are kept alive in restaurants until they are ordered as a high-end delicacy. Photo: ENV / youcaring

About Education for Nature-Vietnam:

ENV spreads awareness about wildlife protection to the Vietnamese public through television and radio public service announcements (PSA’s), as well as public outreach events. ENV works closely with government partners to strengthen policy and legislation, and directly supports law enforcement efforts in the protection of endangered species. Connect with ENV on Facebook.

All eight pangolin species are threatened with extinction.

Two of the four Asian species, the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) and Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica), are listed as Critically Endangered. The Philippine pangolin (Manis culionensis) and Indian pangolin (Manis crassicaudata) are listed as Endangered.

All four African pangolin species — the ground pangolin (Manis temminckii), giant ground pangolin (Manis gigantea), white-bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspid), black-bellied pangolin (Phataginus tetradactyla) — are listed as Vulnerable.

Learn more about pangolins.


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Rhishja Cota-Larson

I am the founder of Annamiticus, and I work as an independent Wildlife Trade and Communication Design Consultant. I have journeyed to the streets of Hanoi to research the illegal wildlife trade, and to the rainforests of Sumatra and Java to document the world’s rarest rhinos. I am a Co-Chair of the SSN Pangolin Working Group. At CITES meetings, I collaborate with colleagues from around the world to lobby in favor of protecting endangered species. I am a Wildlife Trade and Trafficking Consultant for the upcoming documentary The Price, the host of Behind the Schemes and author of the book Murder, Myths & Medicine. I enjoy desert gardening, herping, reading, designing, and walking with my dogs.